Stone Mountain Septic Service

Affordable Septic Service

Stone Mountain Septic Service

Stone Mountain Septic Service; As you know each time you turn on a faucet, flush a toilet, or do a load of laundry, the water and waste travels out of the house and into the Septic Tank. Some of the waste sinks to the bottom and some of it floats. As more water goes into the Septic Systems, an equal amount gets pushed out to the Drain-field.

Stone Mountain Septic Service

From the first Septic Tanks until 1992 there was no real baffle installed in the tank to hold back the sludge from getting close to the outlet end of the tank. On these old style tanks when the water enters the tank, it stirs up the sludge and can push it out into the drain-field blocking the flow of water entering the Drain-field lines.

 
 
In 1992, installation of the baffle made a great improvement at keeping the sludge away from the outlet therefore the stirring affect has been kept to a minimum. This does not mean sludge cannot find its way to the outlet. Only regular Septic Tank pump outs help prevent sludge.

When should I pump the tank? Will additives help breakdown the solids?

Septic Tank Cleaning

Septic Tank Cleaning

Septic Tank Pumping in Stone Mountain should take place every 3-5 years and do not use septic tank additives, commercial septic tank cleaners, yeast, sugar, etc. These products are not necessary and some may be harmful to your system. Only pumping and cleaning routinely can insure a happy septic tank. Solids that build up in the tank and are allowed to pass from the septic tank may clog the absorption field, and cause permanent damage and premature failure. Keeping solids out of the field not only prevents clogging, but also reduces potential expensive repairs or replacement costs and helps ensure the ability of the soil to effectively treat the waste-water.

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Septic Tank Clean Out

The typical septic tank is a large buried rectangular or cylindrical container made of concrete, fiberglass, or polyethylene. A septic tank’s purpose is to separate solids from the waste-water, store and partially decompose as much solid material as possible, while allowing the liquid (or effluent) to go to the drain field.

Waste-water from your toilet, bath, kitchen, and laundry flows into the tank and remains there for 24 hours (known as the retention time) before it passes into the drain field. This helps prevent any clogging of the drain field, which can lead to future failure and costly repairs.

As the volume of sludge and scum builds up, there is less space and also time for the solids to separate before the waste water leaves the tank, which causes the system to be less effective. With not enough time for solids to settle, they can pass into the drain field with the waste water (or clog the effluent filter, if there is one). This causes the drain field to gradually plug and eventually fail, causing sewage to back up into your home through plumbing fixtures. Also, the closer the thickening scum and sludge layers come to the outlet tees, the greater the risk that they can plug the tank inlet tee or pass into the drain field.